RS Components supports Carbon Footprint tree planting programme

RS Components (RS) has committed to off-setting its carbon output by supporting Carbon Footprint’s tree planting programme.

RS has sponsored a total of 500 trees to make them available to replenish woodland in Corby, as well as being planted at primary schools in Corby and Nuneaton. A team of RS senior management and employees were on hand to help with the planting exercise of 350 trees at the Hazel and Thoroughsale ancient woods in Corby this week, to replace those affected by Ash dieback disease.

Eleven RS employees including John Barnacle-Bowd, VP Global Environmental Health and Safety, worked their shovels to help with the mammoth tree planting task in the woodland. A combination of oak, wild cherry, hazel, hornbeam and beech were specifically chosen to support biodiversity and provide habitats for wildlife. There will also be around 50 trees diverted to Mawdsley Nature Park in Corby. Schools recipients of the trees include Little Stanion Primary School in Corby, where 30 trees were planted in March by RS staff, schoolchildren and school staff, and Weddington Primary School in Nuneaton, which has received 70 trees.

Carbon Footprint UK’s tree planting programme supports its mission to help businesses and organisations of all sizes and from all sectors reduce their carbon emissions.

Ken Simpson, environment and sustainability manager at RS Components, said: “Carbon Footprint does great work in helping organisations achieve sustainability for the good of the business, the environment and communities. We are proud to be involved with the tree planting programme, helping to keep our local woodlands thriving and inspiring the next generation about sustainability – as well as working to offset our carbon emissions as a business. Our employees who took part in the planting thoroughly enjoyed it, as did the local community, schoolchildren and staff.”

Dr. Wendy Buckley, Client Director at Carbon Footprint added: “RS Components is taking responsible steps to reduce its impact on climate change, whilst also benefiting the local communities in which the business is based and I am delighted that they are so actively involved with the planting.”

Trees help the carbon emissions by absorbing carbon dioxide to produce oxygen. Planting takes place in school locations and other protected biodiversity sites. As well as offsetting CO2 emissions, it helps provide wildlife habitats, protect native British trees and enhances the natural UK landscape. For further information about Carbon Footprint’s tree planting programme, visit https://www.carbonfootprint.com/plantingtrees.html